New Hampshire Underground

Regional Discussion => Northern NH => Topic started by: freetalklivedotus on May 04, 2008, 10:24 AM NHFT

Title: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: freetalklivedotus on May 04, 2008, 10:24 AM NHFT
I'm looking for a place in northern, French-speaking N.H. and am looking for a sense of libertarian activism there, as opposed to southern, English-speaking N.H.

 Would you say the activity in the south is 75%, 90%, 98%, or what of the total libertarian activism in the state?

 I'm seeking French-speaking libertarian activism, but am thinking if it isn't there, then maybe staying in the south is the way to go?

What do you think?
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: John Edward Mercier on May 04, 2008, 07:21 PM NHFT
NH is divided North-South on Francophiles...
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Russell Kanning on May 04, 2008, 08:49 PM NHFT
there is a french speaking part of NH?
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: KBCraig on May 04, 2008, 09:56 PM NHFT
There are French-speaking libertarian activists?
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: John Edward Mercier on May 05, 2008, 12:35 AM NHFT
Jean Coutu is from the Jaffrey area... not sure if he speaks French.
Larry Boisvert is from Lyndenborough... again not sure if he speaks French.

The history of Francophiles in NH does date back to colonial days when Quebec reached as far south as the three rivers (Franklin). But for the most part their numbers where few except during the  American Revolution.
The second phase of immigration to the lower latitudes occured during the Industrial Revolution, when they migrated to mill towns along the major water ways. So there are pockets around the State.
 
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Kat Kanning on May 05, 2008, 07:27 AM NHFT
Coutu speaks abundantly, but never heard French come out.
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Lloyd Danforth on May 05, 2008, 07:32 AM NHFT
 ;D
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: firecracker joe on May 07, 2008, 12:09 AM NHFT
the towns that  border canada are more french than most but alot of people in NH are french canadian. My name is very french but i only know the swears my grandfather taught me. who came from canada when it was easy.
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Kat Kanning on May 07, 2008, 07:29 AM NHFT
Ah yes, jose, a very traditional French name  :P ;D
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Lloyd Danforth on May 07, 2008, 08:46 AM NHFT
During the first half of the 20th century many people came down from Canada to work in US factories and trades. They were loved and hated, like Hispanic immigrants today, depending on where one stood in the equation.
They settled in neighborhoods.  There might be some French-Canadian culture left, but, I'm guessing it has been diluted due to marriage.
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Pat McCotter on May 07, 2008, 09:44 AM NHFT
Yep. Hartford, CT, still has the Frog Hollow neighborhood.
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: Lloyd Danforth on May 07, 2008, 10:39 AM NHFT
Which, for a short while became Little Portugal and could now be called Little Puerto Rico ;D
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: TresJay on May 07, 2008, 11:18 AM NHFT
I once dated a woman in North Philly that was a French citizen name Jose, pronounced "ZhoZay".   Shortened from Josephine, I assumed.
Title: Re: Northern vs Southern N.H. Libertarian Activism?
Post by: John Edward Mercier on May 07, 2008, 12:44 PM NHFT
During the first half of the 20th century many people came down from Canada to work in US factories and trades. They were loved and hated, like Hispanic immigrants today, depending on where one stood in the equation.
They settled in neighborhoods.  There might be some French-Canadian culture left, but, I'm guessing it has been diluted due to marriage.

I think it was more about being Catholic, but the language barrier didn't help either.