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Author Topic: Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)  (Read 956 times)

PowerPenguin

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Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)
« on: November 17, 2008, 07:00 PM NHFT »

According to the maintenance guide for my Subaru, you can get a bit more bang for your buck by filling up your tank in the evening or early morning when it's cold and the fossil fuels are the most dense. This would theoretically give you a bit extra juice in your tank for the same price. Not knowing anything else, I assume you won't be getting more than a percent or two extra, but maybe someone who's a chemistry expert can provide more details.
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doobie

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Re: Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2008, 07:10 PM NHFT »

I once stopped at a gas station when I was empty, and it was COLD (-10 according to my thermometer).  The pump wouldn't work.  I went inside and they said when it gets cold you usually just have to wait..so I waited about a minute or two and it finally started pumping.  It was the slowest fuelling I ever had...

I think myth busters proved your statement wrong though.
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freeborn

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Re: Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2008, 07:35 PM NHFT »

Gas coming out of an undergrand tank is always at the same temperature as the underground environment which is about 55 degrees. It doesn't matter if you pump your gas when the air temperature is 100 degrees or 20 below zero.
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KBCraig

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Re: Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2008, 11:56 AM NHFT »

I once stopped at a gas station when I was empty, and it was COLD (-10 according to my thermometer).  The pump wouldn't work.  I went inside and they said when it gets cold you usually just have to wait..so I waited about a minute or two and it finally started pumping.  It was the slowest fuelling I ever had...

I've had that during a sudden cold snap. The local news said the flow rate slows when the leak detectors trip, and apparently they're sensitive to cold.
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PowerPenguin

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Re: Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2008, 08:15 PM NHFT »

I once stopped at a gas station when I was empty, and it was COLD (-10 according to my thermometer).  The pump wouldn't work.  I went inside and they said when it gets cold you usually just have to wait..so I waited about a minute or two and it finally started pumping.  It was the slowest fuelling I ever had...

I've had that during a sudden cold snap. The local news said the flow rate slows when the leak detectors trip, and apparently they're sensitive to cold.


Damn are you saying Fuji Motors, or at least the local dealership that published the flier is ignorant or lying!?? (Stranger things have happened)
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Roycerson

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Re: Cold Gas is Cool (literally and figuratively)
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2008, 08:19 PM NHFT »

I think so.  Don't know much about flow rates and leak detectors but most tanks are underground.  Might change a few degrees depending on the season but not a significant difference by time of day.
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