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"Let them march all they want, as long as they pay their taxes."  --Alexander Haig

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Author Topic: New Hampshire Granites  (Read 3370 times)

FTL_Ian

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2006, 01:52 AM NHFT »

Whether it's metals backed, or something else, one thing is for sure:   Something good will develop in NH.  With all the real money people moving in, it's inevitable.  Competition will be the decider, and all the world will want our most popular currency.   8)
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FrankChodorov

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2006, 05:21 AM NHFT »

Quote
That's pretty much number 1 on my list too - getting rid of or lowering property taxes. I'm not knocking that.

I just don't see why we should work to create a NH money system, when it's just as easy to create a private one.

combine the two...

lien your appreciating land values that are not the result of your labor but rather your neighbors' labor.

convert the liens to scrip and then share them equally with your neighbors (and they with you).
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Ron Helwig

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2006, 08:31 AM NHFT »

lien your appreciating land values that are not the result of your labor but rather your neighbors' labor.

If the value appreciation is the result of your neighbor's labor, then it isn't your property so using that would be theft.
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FrankChodorov

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2006, 03:03 PM NHFT »

lien your appreciating land values that are not the result of your labor but rather your neighbors' labor.

If the value appreciation is the result of your neighbor's labor, then it isn't your property so using that would be theft.

today the claim is that ot is the landowner's property.

lien it and issue a non-redeemable scrip against it...
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PowerPenguin

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #34 on: May 20, 2006, 12:05 AM NHFT »


today the claim is that ot is the landowner's property.

lien it and issue a non-redeemable scrip against it...

That sounds like fiat only worse man 8-)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2006, 12:48 AM NHFT by powerpenguin »
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FrankChodorov

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #35 on: May 20, 2006, 04:43 PM NHFT »


today the claim is that ot is the landowner's property.

lien it and issue a non-redeemable scrip against it...

That sounds like fiat only wors man 8-)

I view money as a pure social construct not as a store of value within the coins themselves or re-deemable...
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PowerPenguin

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #36 on: May 21, 2006, 12:49 AM NHFT »

Why is this a good idea? If it's not backed, you'll end up with a FRN like system.
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burnthebeautiful

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #37 on: May 21, 2006, 12:03 PM NHFT »

The NHG's could be backed by granite...
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Marcy

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #38 on: May 22, 2006, 06:10 AM NHFT »

I don't mean to be contrarian, especially because I'm still a bit new here and this is my first post of any length.  However, seems to me that if the whole culture is getting ready to hit the wall at a high rate of speed with expected and disasterous consequences, one might do best to walk deliberately in the opposite direction. 

America is in the jam she's in, to a significant degree, because her people can think of a whole lot more ways to spend money than they can figure ways to produce things or avoid spending money altogether.  That's a fairly broad generalization, and it may not even apply to most of the people reading this post, but the fact remains that America -- and Americans -- are debtors.   It doesn't matter whether that started from the top down  (manipulations of fiat money, intrerest rates and energy & foreigh policy) or the bottom up (a population hooked on Starbucks and Circuit City, the latest twist on bread and circuses).   The result is the same.  We spend as much as or more than we earn -- and we don't save.  Doesn't matter if you demoninate that reality in granites, liberty dollars, FRN's, silver coin, euros or glass beads. 

People are traders and yes, we will always need to buy (and sell) things.  The kids will always need new shoes.  We don't grow wheat, oranges, spices or coffee in NH -- and even if we grew everything else we needed to eat in NH, we'd have to pay hard money for those things.  Electricity, prescription meds, mortgages, these things will probably all need to be paid with the prevailing scrip (FRN).   

When the fit hits the shan -- and we can all see that coming down the road -- people in the habit of spending little and saving much will ride out the storm much better than those living paycheck-to-paycheck.  We'll see some very squirrelly things happen to fiat money, so it will probably do well to preserve savings by having a healthy chunk in silver.  However, if fiat money goes down the tubes, the country will be in such a state of crisis -- and rattled nerves -- that few people will want to trust a new and relatively unknown currency.  Hoping they will do so is a little like trying to cinvince people used to gold and silver that wampum -- or paper money -- is a good idea.  Difficult at best, and impossible in a crisis.

There are many ways one can walk deliberately away from the direction the country is headed.  Saving money and preserving it in precious metals seems to me a better way to do that than creating anoother kind of currency.

Just my opinion.



It is impossible for an empty sack to stand upright.       -- Poor Richard
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Ron Helwig

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #39 on: May 22, 2006, 06:56 AM NHFT »

People are traders and yes, we will always need to buy (and sell) things.  The kids will always need new shoes.  We don't grow wheat, oranges, spices or coffee in NH -- and even if we grew everything else we needed to eat in NH, we'd have to pay hard money for those things.  Electricity, prescription meds, mortgages, these things will probably all need to be paid with the prevailing scrip (FRN).   

When the fit hits the shan -- and we can all see that coming down the road -- people in the habit of spending little and saving much will ride out the storm much better than those living paycheck-to-paycheck.  We'll see some very squirrelly things happen to fiat money, so it will probably do well to preserve savings by having a healthy chunk in silver.  However, if fiat money goes down the tubes, the country will be in such a state of crisis -- and rattled nerves -- that few people will want to trust a new and relatively unknown currency.  Hoping they will do so is a little like trying to cinvince people used to gold and silver that wampum -- or paper money -- is a good idea.  Difficult at best, and impossible in a crisis.

There are many ways one can walk deliberately away from the direction the country is headed.  Saving money and preserving it in precious metals seems to me a better way to do that than creating anoother kind of currency.

Yay! And welcome.

I have found that almost everyone seems to know that gold and silver are money, even if they only recognize it subconsciously.

I seem to see hidden in your post the idea that we maybe should be spending a bit more time and effort on becoming producers. Good idea. I've been thinking about possible ways to use my property to produce, as well as to reduce its maintenance costs (such as electricity).
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fourthgeek

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #40 on: May 22, 2006, 07:18 PM NHFT »

Gaining as much self-sufficiency as possible probably is the key to success in the coming years.

Sadly, I'm going to be in college for the next (few) years, and considering that the local university is giving me a free ride, it's seeming less and less likely that I will get into Dartmouth. Hopefully things will wait a few years and I can graduate, buy some land, and get somewhat prepared before things get too awful.

I still think that an electronic bartering currency would be cheapest and most sensible (as long as we can all retain our electricity, that is!)
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Dave Ridley

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #41 on: May 23, 2006, 07:02 PM NHFT »

Good to have you here in the discussion Marcy.  Hope you will stick around this forum and keep the ideas rolling; that is a big way you can help the pro liberty fight, just by hanging out here.   are you in-state or just in-terested?
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Marcy

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #42 on: May 23, 2006, 09:42 PM NHFT »

Thanks, Dada and Ron.
I am one of the original 5,000 FSP voters, one who had no problem voting for NH since I'd already been comfortably relocated here for a decade (refugeed from the People's Republic of New York).  My thirteen-year old daughter and I are owned by two cats and live in Concord.   I hope to make a contribution here, such as it is.

M.
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PowerPenguin

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #43 on: May 23, 2006, 09:56 PM NHFT »

Cool. How is the Concord area? I'm currently a college student on the WC, but I'm thinking of moving there. Is it true that Concord is the most urban-like town in the state? (I'm used to living in places like San Diego and Seattle, just for some background)
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Marcy

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Re: New Hampshire Granites
« Reply #44 on: May 23, 2006, 10:19 PM NHFT »

LOL  Concord is a city of around 50,000 that desperately hopes it gets to stay a small town.  (Witness:  law here stipulates that NO new building can be built taller than the Capitol, which puts everything at about 3 stories or under).   Concord is charming and quirky and fairly expensive, as places to live go, rather pedestrian-friendly but choking on traffic.   We have a law school here as well as a 2-year technical institute, but Concord does not come across as a "college town".   If you're looking for urban, Manchester or Portsmouth might be more to your taste. 
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