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"Let them march all they want, as long as they pay their taxes."  --Alexander Haig

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Author Topic: Galt's Gulch  (Read 3877 times)

ArvinJA

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Galt's Gulch
« on: January 19, 2009, 12:55 PM NHFT »

Isn't NH the Colorado of Atlas Shrugged? Wouldn't it be awesome to create a secret village in NH? Although not as secret as Galt's Gulch, but so secret so that one would never get bothered by government.
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Barterer

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2009, 02:09 PM NHFT »

Yes. That would be very cool.. and not possible.  There would just be way too many information leaks, moles, heat signatures, etc.

But you can still sort of "gulch" where you are, just by keeping a good portion of your life private, and away from the trappings of conventional life (like US dollars).  Rand's gulch was half of my inspiration to create ShireHours.. the other half is being unable to do NH activism, and doing something over the web is the next best thing.
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K. Darien Freeheart

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2009, 04:51 PM NHFT »

Galt's Gulch.. Not so much. I like the Sam Konkin's visions of how agorism would progress though. Eliminates the need for hiding and makes the messy business of lacking Reardon Metal easier to cope with.
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Lloyd Danforth

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2009, 06:53 PM NHFT »

Isn't NH the Colorado of Atlas Shrugged? Wouldn't it be awesome to create a secret village in NH? Although not as secret as Galt's Gulch, but so secret so that one would never get bothered by government.
OK!  You work on the Mountain Projector and I'll figure out how to harness energy from static electricity.
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Barterer

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2009, 07:25 PM NHFT »

You'd need a darn good projector at that.. remember those eco-people made a secret village in Wales and that was spotted even though they made their roofs out of sod and the whole village looked like nothing more than a slight discoloration of the ground.

So.. no possibility of a gulch.  A more likely scenario is New Hampshire becoming the US version of Hong Kong.  Of course the top brass in Washington would need to have at least as much sense as the red Chinese, to let it exist and flourish.. oh, maybe one day..  ::)
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Pat McCotter

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2009, 07:50 PM NHFT »

Isn't NH the Colorado of Atlas Shrugged? Wouldn't it be awesome to create a secret village in NH? Although not as secret as Galt's Gulch, but so secret so that one would never get bothered by government.
OK!  You work on the Mountain Projector and I'll figure out how to harness energy from static electricity.

It look like Tesla may have been correct in wanting to transmit electricity.

Death of the cell phone charger
A Pennsylvania entrepreneur has developed technology that gives you all the battery juice you need directly from the air.
By Melanie Haiken, Business 2.0 Magazine
March 30 2007: 7:08 AM EDT

(Business 2.0 Magazine) -- How much money could you make from a technology that replaces electrical wires? A startup called Powercast, along with the more than 100 companies that have inked agreements with it, is about to start finding out. Powercast and its first major partner, electronics giant Philips, are set to launch their first device powered by electricity broadcast through the air.

It may sound futuristic, but Powercast's platform uses nothing more complex than a radio--and is cheap enough for just about any company to incorporate into a product. A transmitter plugs into the wall, and a dime-size receiver (the real innovation, costing about $5 to make) can be embedded into any low-voltage device. The receiver turns radio waves into DC electricity, recharging the device's battery at a distance of up to 3 feet.
Picture your cell phone charging up the second you sit down at your desk, and you start to get a sense of the opportunity. How big can it get? "The sky's the limit," says John Shearer, Powercast's founder and CEO. He estimates shipping "many millions of units" by the end of 2008.

For years, electricity experts said this kind of thing couldn't be done. "If you had asked me seven months ago if this was possible, I would have said, 'Are you dreaming? Have you been smoking something?'" says Govi Rao, vice president and general manager of solid-state lighting at Philips (Charts). "But to see it work is just amazing. It could revolutionize what we know about power."
World's 11 coolest products

So impressed was Rao after witnessing Powercast's demo last summer that he walked away jotting down a list of the industries to which the technology could immediately be applied: lighting, peripherals, all kinds of handheld electronics. Philips partnered with Powercast last July, and their first joint product, a wirelessly powered LED light stick, will hit the market this year. Computer peripherals, such as a wireless keyboard and mouse, will follow in 2008.

Broadcasting power through the air isn't a new idea. Researchers have experimented with capturing the radiation in radio frequency at high power but had difficulty capturing it at consumer-friendly low power. "You'd have energy bouncing off the walls and arriving in a wide range of voltages," says Zoya Popovic, an electrical engineering professor at the University of Colorado who works on wireless electricity projects for the U.S. military.
That's where Shearer came in. A former physicist based in Pittsburgh, he and his team spent four years poring over wireless electricity research in a lab hidden behind his family's coffee house. He figured much of the energy bouncing off walls could be captured. All you had to do was build a receiver that could act like a radio tuned to many frequencies at once.


"I realized we wanted to grab that static and harness it," Shearer says. "It's all energy."
Entrepreneur finds 'suite' dreams

So the Powercast team set about creating and patenting that receiver. Its tiny but hyperefficient receiving circuits can adjust to variations in load and field strength while maintaining a constant DC voltage. Thanks to the fact that it transmits only safe low wattages, the Powercast system quickly won FCC approval--and $10 million from private investors.

Powercast says it has signed nondisclosure agreements to develop products with more than 100 companies, including major manufacturers of cell phones, MP3 players, automotive parts, temperature sensors, hearing aids, and medical implants.

The last of those alone could be a multibillion-dollar market: Pacemakers, defibrillators, and the like require surgery to replace dead batteries. But with a built-in Powercast receiver, those batteries could last a lifetime.

"Everyone's looking to cut that last cord," says Alex Slawsby, a consultant at Innosight who specializes in disruptive innovation. "Think of the billion cell phones sold last year. If you could get Powercast into a small percentage of the high-end models, those would be huge numbers."

Could Powercast's technology also work for larger devices? Perhaps, but not quite yet. Laptop computers, for example, use more than 10 times the wattage of Powercast transmissions.

But industry trends are on Shearer's side: Thanks to less energy-hungry LCD screens and processors, PC power consumption is slowly diminishing. Within five years, Shearer says, laptops will be down to single-digit wattage--making his revenue potential even more electrifying.
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Moebius Tripp

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2009, 08:25 PM NHFT »

The US Army tore down a Tesla wireless power transmitter in New Jersey.  It could be replicated on a smaller scale in a private valley, maybe.  Basically, it's a huge tesla coil with a primary coil (similar to an electric stove's heating element oriented vertically) buried in the ground, resonating at the earth's frequency.  Two more coils increase the frequency, ending in a toroidal coil at the top that transmits a high-frequency signal.  Build a smaller version of same at the points where you need power, and voila, nearly free electricity.  Another possibility is a stop-gap generator in a faraday cage.
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ArvinJA

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2009, 01:07 AM NHFT »

Or... We could have giant hamsters running in giant hamster wheels, and harness their power!  ;D
No but seriously, hiding something from the government would be next to impossible, so ltet's be realistic.
We do not hide, we'll only make it really obscure with lots of redundancy so if something breaks, we'll have a backup, it works with computers! ;)
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Russell Kanning

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2009, 02:28 AM NHFT »

none of us have any plans down those lines ... nothing to see here
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ColdSoul

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2009, 01:39 PM NHFT »

Sadly I haven't read the book but I understand the concept.

Keeping something hidden can be difficult if people especially the government is looking for it.

Now I don't think hiding a few people and or small group isn't impossible though they just have to be skilled and keep a low profile.

Do some research into the way the Japanese soldier lived and hide for years after ww2 because the thought the war wasn't over.

Using any type of power or electricity would make hiding harder as it would be easy to spot the electricity in a forest.

If I was trying to hide from the government and other people I would find the biggest forest possible say maybe the boreal forest in Canada which is the biggest uninterrupted forest in the world I heard. I would build underground and I would give the government no reason to use resources to find me.

I would develop a way to hunt silently and sustain that which again means less people. Growing crops would be difficult because it makes spotting your settlement easier.

I also wouldn't go to this place until I knew I had no choice or the government was so distracted that finding me would be the least of its worries.

Setup a few of there small communities close enough to share resources and people but far enough apart to make finding them all impractical.

Setup your gultch now but don't live there until you know the government is worried about the wide spread looting and killing.

Also make sure you have a way to get there that doesn't require a car because by the time you need to go that type of transport might be impossible.

Also look into the booby traps that can be made from what nature provides so you can make a full assault impossibly hard and give you time to get out to another community nearby but ideally if you keep a low enough profile by the time you start mounting a resistance and using gorrila tactics the don't have the resources to fight you or find you effectively.

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Russell Kanning

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2009, 09:00 PM NHFT »

that sounds like torture to me, not freedom
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ColdSoul

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2009, 09:49 PM NHFT »

that sounds like torture to me, not freedom

Are you referring to the OP, or to what I posted?

If you are referring to what I posted I have a few questions...

How is living off the land torture?

I consider it torture to deal with most of the crap that is on tv, radio and the media. I consider it torture to not be able to live off the land as the great ancestors of many Americans use to be able to do without government interference. This is why I am fighting for freedom to be able to make those choices for myself. Everyone has there own idea of what torture is, and to me living off the land, and being able to do what I like as long as I keep to myself is no where near torture.

Watching American Idol is torture, watching politician after politician get elected to steal my money and my rights is torture. Slipping off into the woods and living in harmony with nature is no where near the torture I would deal with watching just watching a few minutes of TV is most cases.

Living the way I posted is very similar to a "Matrix" type scenario in that you have the choice of being a battery, or if you would "sheeple" which give you a "comfortable life" or you can leave that behind and live a life of hand to mouth without anyone telling you want to do.

Again in Firefly Malcolm Reynolds says "it doesn't matter how long the arm of the alliance gets, we just have to get out a little further" or something very similar. I would prefer to be at the edge of that arm, and be a bit uncomfortable then to sit and let the government control my every movement.

And yes I know it's not to that point, but if it does get to that point I want to be as prepared as possible. I want to have the knowledge and skills to be able to walk off into the woods and never be seen again and live a semi-comfortable life.

I guess your not a Browncoat?
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Russell Kanning

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2009, 11:26 PM NHFT »

hiding from everyone like that guy did after ww2 sounds like a horrible way to live.
I don't know what a browncoat is, so I must not be one.
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Tom Sawyer

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2009, 04:45 AM NHFT »

You wouldn't be hiding from the authorities as much as the neighbors.

How can you even drive in and out of your property without the tracks in the snow giving you away.
Easier to hide in a large city than in the forest.

You have to create a safe house, a place that activity is apparently normal.
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Barterer

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Re: Galt's Gulch
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2009, 10:31 AM NHFT »

Ok, I'll probably get my monkey-tail flamed off for being a compromising wimp, but I say go half and half.  Work part-time at a conventional job, have a plausible source of income and keep your visible assets modest. 

Then with the other half of your working hours, trade only in cash, gold, IOUs, whatever your favorite medium of exchange is.  That's your gulch; that portion of your life that is totally, privately yours. 

The frustrating think about being ancap/libertarian/voluntaryist/agorist or whatever is the impossibility of taking your entire life for yourself. I say let it go. It's putting miles on your heart and shortening your life just thinking about it, just having the frustration and futility of trying to achieve complete freedom and not being able to, because there are simply too many statist jackasses living among us. Accept it, and take what you can.
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